Tag Archives: politics

Frightening possibilities

I hadn’t thought about the possibility of McCain withdrawing from the presidential race before November — or not, in fact, securing the nomination at the Republican convention. Frank Dwyer’s piece on the Huffington Post today about just such a possibility does not seem unfeasible when given some thought. It could indeed be the one dramatic surprise move the GOP could conjure up to effectively compete against Barack Obama. Ultimately I break with Dwyer’s argument that Jeb Bush would be that surprise candidate. Different as he may be from his brother, Jeb, as one commenter points out after Dwyer’s piece, will now be tainted by the Bush name and have as difficult a time distancing himself from George W. as John McCain will have distancing himself from association based on their shared party (and positions). No, if such an 11th-hour surprise were to occur it would have to be a different name carrying the mantle. Those who don’t want to see it happen should nevertheless prepare themselves for the possibility.

Here’s Dwyer’s piece.

Obama and the “white vote”

Just saw this interesting post at Barack Oblogger. It’s a simple post, but it makes the point effectively. Despite the past week’s scuttlebutt over Hillary Clinton and “white, working class voters,” Barack Obama has won nominating contests in eight of the nation’s 15 whitest states (I’m trusting it’s quantified by a percentage of the overall population, the definition of whiteness or nonwhiteness — always somewhat frought — seems somewhat hard to actually hang a number upon). Results aren’t in yet for Montana (which votes June 3) or Kentucky, which votes tomorrow (along with Oregon). I think the vote in Kentucky  will be much closer than it was in West Virginia but still lean toward’s Hillary, but Obama has run away with the vote in mountainous, western states (and might I say, Republican bastions), so he’ll sew it up in Montana. I also predict he’ll blow Hillary out of the water in Oregon (also tomorrow), not in this list of 15 but still far from a bastion of diversity (not to mention a place where working class ideals have incredible mileage).

Not having been there for almost four years I still feel I can speak from experience that Maine, which tops the whiteness chart (and how!) is undoubtedly Obama country, and Mainers are so wicked far from elitist that it alone shatters the “working class” myth Hillary’s campaign touts.

Meanwhile, back in our galaxy

Alright, alright, yes, I am probably blogger No. 234,807,097,921 to link to this video today. But come on. How can you not resist The Empire Strikes Barack.

Enjoy:

New York’s pot to San Francisco’s kettle

I’ll leave the debate about elitism in the presidential race to the drones and foot soldiers of the 2008 campaign, as well as the more articulate prognosticators on the 2008 election season (or is that too elite a wording?). Besides, so far, I’d say John Stewart probably said it best during the April 14 edition of The Daily Show when he reminded us the President of the United States of America is possibly the most elite position in the entire world (Hi, Yale grad, Skull & Bones member and son of a Bush; Hello Mr. Rhodes Scholar).

No, I’ll focus on a different hypocrisy among this deluge of hypocrisies surrounding these false accusations of elitism. Within Maureen Dowd’s New York Times op-ed on the subject she writes the following:

“Behind closed doors in San Francisco, elitism’s epicenter [Emphasis added], Barack Obama showed his elitism, attributing the emotional, spiritual and cultural values of working-class, “lunch pail” Pennsylvanians to economic woes.”

Who would have thought a Southern Californian like me would so readily stick up for San Francisco, but WHAT? A high-profile columnist and supporter of one of the most mainstream of mainstream politicians, writing for The New York Times, the “Old Gray Lady” of modern journalism, is calling San Francisco “elitism’s epicenter?” Penning a column for the pre-eminent publication in a city that claims to never sleep, dubs itself “The Big Apple,” acts as the arbiter of American fashion, the heart of global business, and acts as if it is the urban reincarnation of Jesus, Dowd still somehow believes San Francisco is the epicenter of elitism. Continue reading

The perils of municipal meetings

One of the newest videos circulating around the Internet is this one of a fracas during a Carson city council meeting.

Many people criticize the bickering at city council meetings throughout our fair county, but at least none of our local disputes have reached this level of immaturity. Then again, the bop on the head and the faked injury depicted in this video are indicative, symbolic perhaps, of the behavior deployed in letters to the editor, comment periods, negotiations and workshops far too often. The constructed — and poorly acted — reaction of the aggrieved (if anyone can honestly call it that) party in this video certainly evoke some of the paranoid rhetoric of certain players in local politics in Ventura County, indeed, of players from all sides of the issues.

Anyhow, it’s quite funny.